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Gang Intervention Resources & Delinquency Program

Specific gang intervention programs with a heavy CBT emphasis. When creating a comprehensive MI/MET and CBT gang intervention program, these materials are essential. Part of our comprehensive curriculum, these materials are best suited to middle school, high school, and alternative school students.

Gang Intervention Resources

Catalog Code Title Description
GG10 What Do You Think? (brief activities) This series of program activities is designed to facilitate participation, group cooperation, and self-disclosure. They range from 5-30 minutes, and can be used to open a class session or provide a “change of pace” later in the session. We provide three age-appropriate versions of this resource. Please specify: grades 4-6, grades 7-12, or adult. Similar to The Phoenix Curriculum resource.
GG1 What Was On Your Mind? This is an important workbook, a cognitive restructuring approach to gang activity. It identifies selected negative mind-sets common to people involved in gang activity. Then, it addresses each of these in a systematic fashion, identifying weaknesses in that form of thinking, and offering guidance in the development of a more positive outlook.
GG2 Who Wants to be at Risk? This workbook addresses the "risk factors" approach to gang involvement and activity. The objective is for participants to identify their own highest risk factors and acknowledge that these risks and temptations will be out there, waiting, upon release.
GG3 What do You Need? (needs and gangs) This workbook — based on Maslow’s needs hierarchy theory — addresses gang activity from the point of view of underlying needs. These needs won’t go away; they will be present when the participants return to the community. Thus this workbook guides the participants in finding alternative — and better — ways to meet those needs than gangs or crime.
GG4 Living a Nonviolent Life #1 This workbook provides the opportunity for clients to identify their triggers and highest personal risk factors for violence and to develop strategies to avoid these issues or to cope more effectively in the future.
GG5 Living a Nonviolent Life #2 This workbook provides a more focused opportunity for clients to identify their highest risk factors for violence (the people, places, things, times, and situations where they are at highest risk). It guides the development of “environmental control” strategies to avoid these issues and situations - and helps clients explore their options.
GG7 Understanding Yourself #1 This is the “risk factors” approach to aggression and violence. It provides an alternative approach to violence issues and behavior, addressing community and family risk factors for violence. For clients, the objective is to begin by increasing awareness. Then, clients can admit that they have these risk factors and acknowledge that these risks and temptations will be out there, waiting, upon release.
GG8 Understanding Yourself #2 This is the “risk factors” approach to passive-aggressive behavior, which can often lead to violence and other problems. It provides an alternative approach to violence, addressing community and family risk factors for this passive-aggressive behavior. (Approach is similar to GG7, above)
GG9 Reducing Your Risk (for females between the ages of 15 and 22) This workbook addresses the “risk factors” approach to gang involvement and activity for females.
GG11 Program Activities This series of 60 program activities is designed to facilitate participation, group involvement and cooperation, and self-disclosure. Many are based on traditional experiential learning approaches. They range from 10-50 minutes, and provide a “change of pace” for participants and staff.
GG12 What Do You Think? (women’s materials) This series of 18 program activities is designed to facilitate participation, group cooperation, and self-disclosure.
GG13a Gang Intervention Resources: Where Are Your Old Friends Today? Participants will explore options leading to gang involvement—or staying away from gangs.
GG13b Gang Intervention Resources: Criminal Values Participants will explore areas of criminogenic thinking and values.
GG13c Gang Intervention Resources: Respect Participants will explore issues relating to “respect.” This activity addresses the respect they give others, as well as ways to gain respect from others.
GG13d Gang Intervention Resources: How To Identify Your Real Friends Participants will explore issues relating to true friendship.
GG13d Gang Intervention Resources: How To Identify Your Real Friends (non-correctional edition) Same as above for the non-correctional context.
GG13e Gang Intervention Resources: Thinking About Stereotypes This activity addresses the issues of stereotyping and prejudice.
GG13f Gang Intervention Resources: Loyalty Loyalty and relationships.
GG13g Gang Intervention Resources: Media Influences How have the movies, music, and TV influenced you?
GG13h Gang Intervention Resources: Do The Math The prospect of earning a lot of money through drug dealing can be very appealing. This lesson asks participants to “do the math” in comparing the risks and rewards of drug dealing with the risks and rewards of earning money legitimately.
GG14 Getting Away From the Gang Comprehensive manual, providing suggestions, action planning, and support to assist in leaving the gang. Includes typical situations for role-playing practice and self-efficacy.

Delinquency Program

Catalog Code Title Description
DP1/RI15 You Have Options Risk factors-based workbook for high risk youth. Clients identify problem situations and practice options to substance abuse or violence. Action planning activities support personal change. (Different versions provided for detention, diversion, and community programs.)
DP2/CS1/CP2 Coping Skills For Emergencies Clients learn to identify their own highest risk situations, the cues that they are becoming at higher risk, what they will do to cope effectively, and then practice these new coping skills until they are confident they will work. Included in these skills are thought stopping, conflict avoidance and “escape” skills, and a comprehensive set of “refusal skills.” (Different versions provided for detention, diversion, and community programs.)
DP3/CP3/F12/RI17 Let’s Talk About Feelings Specific feelings (anger, anxiety or fear, low-self-esteem/shame, hurt, and loneliness) are addressed in activities which help clients identify and experience feelings safely. (Different versions provided for detention, diversion, and community programs.)
DP4/CP4/RI20 Gangs Short workbook helps client identify gang issues and options to participation.
DP5/CP5/RI18 Violence At Home Short workbook helps clients understand family violence and its’ consequences. Helps clients identify safe choices and available options.
DP6/CP6 Problems At Home This short workbook is designed to help clients start to discuss family issues (neglect, abuse, abandonment, or addictions) with program staff. (For juvenile programs)
DP8/SD12/RH25/CP8 Key Elements of Change This workbook provides a comprehensive overview of personal change from substance abuse. It includes elements of motivational enhancement therapy (MET) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), as well as analysis of risk factors, the development of key coping and refusal skills, and the development of a safety net. To build increased self-efficacy, it can be supplemented by selected workbooks from the RH series (i.e. RH11, 12, 13, 17, 21, 22, 23,or 24). Also suitable for review and aftercare programs.
DP9/SD11 “What’s Going On In My Life?” Introductory workbook helps identify feelings, issues, and risk factors, reducing resistance, and beginning the process of personal awareness and change. Based on motivational enhancement (MET model).

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